Facebook: Can we have a filter for all innocent civilians?

This letter from Some E-Cards is a brilliant critique of Facebook’s ‘France Filter’. Here is one key section.

the answer to the problems facing our world lies beyond notions of nationalism, and so-called national identity. Beyond notions of allies and enemies. Beyond symbols representing bloodshed on the battlefield, imperial conquest, and lines drawn on maps.

It’s also because, if every day I was to change my Facebook profile picture into the translucent flag of the countries where people had died atrocious deaths that day—atrocious, unnecessary deaths by bullets, bombs and chemical weapons, as well as economic and environmental crimes we are yet to name—it would represent all the colors of the rainbow. From Syria to Lebanon, from Iraq and Afghanistan to Sri Lanka and North Korea; from Burundi to Burma and Mexico. For the children shot dead in American classrooms, and the women killed by their partners in Australia. And for the asylum seekers drowning in droves as they try to reach safer shores.

And, of course, for France. Douce France.

So, Facebook, give me a symbol that represents the scope of global suffering and I will wear it.

For an example of another attack which got almost not coverage, see this about 2,000 civilians being killed in Nigeria back in January.

About Oso Sabio

Independent author and poet writing about the Rojava Revolution, the autonomous Zapatista communities in Chiapas, and other examples of libertarian socialist and anti-capitalist resistance. Catch me on Twitter at @ososabiouk. Also known as Ed Sykes and Marcos Villa.
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